Posted inArts+Movies, Culture Shock

Charleston Museum presents lecture series celebrating 350 years of Carolina

[image-1] In collaboration with The Charleston 350 Commemoration and in acknowledgement of the 350th anniversary of the founding of Carolina, The Charleston Museum hosts a lecture series featuring three distinguished speakers, starting this Sun. March 8.

The first of the three lectures will be presented by historian Jon Marcoux who will closely examine the Native American settlements of 1669. The lecture, “Lowcountry Life before Charleston Towne: Native American Communities in 1669,” takes place on Sun. March 8 at 6 p.m.

In his 20 years of experience in the cultural resource management field, Marcoux has collaborated with architectural historians, public historians, museum professionals, and government agencies to manage projects involving historically significant buildings and archaeological sites.

Marcoux’s current research is focused on early colonial interactions between Native Americans, enslaved Africans, and Europeans in the southeastern United States. In his numerous publications, Marcoux has explored the ways that Cherokees, Savannahs, and other Native American groups navigated the social and political turmoil caused by European colonialism.

The second lecture of the series will cover the development of slavery in colonial South Carolina with Daniel Littlefield on April 2 at 6 p.m. Littlefield is the Carolina Professor of History at the University of South Carolina.

Finally, the third lecture on May 7 at 6 p.m. will discuss the way that various cultures have influenced the Charleston that we know today with David J. Cranford, assistant state archaeologist for the North Carolina Department of Cultural and Natural Resources.

Each lecture is free and open to the public, and registration is recommended.  [event-1]


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City Paper has been bringing the best news, food, arts, music and event coverage to the Holy City since 1997. Support our continued efforts to highlight the best of Charleston with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.

Posted inArts+Movies, Culture Shock

Charleston Museum presents lecture series celebrating 350 years of Carolina

Courtesy Charleston Museum

[image-1] In collaboration with The Charleston 350 Commemoration and in acknowledgement of the 350th anniversary of the founding of Carolina, The Charleston Museum hosts a lecture series featuring three distinguished speakers, starting this Sun. March 8.

The first of the three lectures will be presented by historian Jon Marcoux who will closely examine the Native American settlements of 1669. The lecture, “Lowcountry Life before Charleston Towne: Native American Communities in 1669,” takes place on Sun. March 8 at 6 p.m.

In his 20 years of experience in the cultural resource management field, Marcoux has collaborated with architectural historians, public historians, museum professionals, and government agencies to manage projects involving historically significant buildings and archaeological sites.

Marcoux’s current research is focused on early colonial interactions between Native Americans, enslaved Africans, and Europeans in the southeastern United States. In his numerous publications, Marcoux has explored the ways that Cherokees, Savannahs, and other Native American groups navigated the social and political turmoil caused by European colonialism.

The second lecture of the series will cover the development of slavery in colonial South Carolina with Daniel Littlefield on April 2 at 6 p.m. Littlefield is the Carolina Professor of History at the University of South Carolina.

Finally, the third lecture on May 7 at 6 p.m. will discuss the way that various cultures have influenced the Charleston that we know today with David J. Cranford, assistant state archaeologist for the North Carolina Department of Cultural and Natural Resources.

Each lecture is free and open to the public, and registration is recommended. 


Stay cool. Support City Paper.

City Paper has been bringing the best news, food, arts, music and event coverage to the Holy City since 1997. Support our continued efforts to highlight the best of Charleston with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.