Local singer-songwriter Laura Jane Vincent has made the switch from acoustic to electric guitar as her main thing, with ukulele and piano in her repertoire as well. 

“I found it more of an easier transition than I thought it would be. I didn’t know if it would fit with my style of playing and my approach to songwriting, but I’ve found it a perfect fit. I’ve been learning a lot about guitar and how to do it better.”

She’s currently on tour for her “electric space folk” album, All These Machines, and Oct. 14, she will be playing Tin Roof .

Though she’s now based in Greensboro, N.C., Vincent shaped herself as a musician in the local scene for a decade after her college years. 

“Charleston is a city that teaches you to go before you’re ready.”

Her balladic stories on the 2014 LP For a Sweetheart from the South differs from All These Machines on which she sought to deliver a bigger sound with a full band collaboration. “On some songs there were 11 musicians and some songs it’s just me and my guitar.”

In the past, Vincent focused her storytelling lens on people who should know better but can’t help themselves, straying from straightforward personal revelations. With her newest album, she demonstrates that she isn’t afraid to go there now. 

“I didn’t hide aspects of whether it was about me or not. It didn’t matter anymore because it was going to be about me regardless — that maturity has been more present for me. These songs are about things I went through and survived.”

Oct. 14, she will perform with hard-driving folk groups Drunken Prayer and Farewell Friend, which is led by guitarist Tom Troyer who produced All These Machines and plays with Vincent’s ensemble. Also joining Vincent will be her longtime bassist Danny Infinger and drummer Scott Dence. 

“It will be a fuller sound, more fleshed out with more emotions coming through the music, not just the words,” she said.

Tickets for the 9 p.m. show are $5 at the door.