Posted inFeedback FileMusic+Clubs

ONE AT A TIME: Oukuo takes us to "The Blue City"; The Four20s take us to "Foureverland"; and Down Under takes us there

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"The Blue City," Oukuo

Guitarist, songwriter, and bandleader Thomas Kenney continues to show his range as a musician on his latest project, Oukuo. While the busy musician is best known for electro jam band Doom Flamingo and world-beat group Terraphonics, Kenney shows his chops as a producer on "The Blue City." A dance beat keeps the song flowing through instrumental solos, reaching a climactic peak at the end. It begs for a dance-club remix, stat.

"Foureverland," Four20s
Speaking of musicians that can't seem to sit still for too long, the Four20s released their debut single, "Foureverland," this week. Incorporating the soulful vocals of Saeed, the band of sought-after musicians creates an emotive alt. R&B jam. Keyboardist Rodrick Cliche left his fingerprints all over the track, most noticeable in the electronic production tucked behind the lead vocals.

"Calling Your Name," Steve Ray Ladson
R&B and pop singer Steve Ray Ladson's latest single, "Calling Your Name," is now available on streaming. Ladson's sound is usually made-for-radio jams, and his latest is no exception. His confident voice sounds like it was meant for acoustic and piano love songs like this one.

"We've Got Time," Jerry Feels Good
Jerry Feels Good, Clayton James, and Stormy put out a hybrid of a track with "We've Got Time." It's a little pop, a little rap, a little club-inspired dance music, and a lot of groove. The verses are straight-forward and bouncing rap bars, while the chorus and bridge were built for a DJ set.

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"Of Treachery and the Flesh (ft. Lou Thor of Depressor)," Down Under
Down Under, City Paper's 2019 Metal Band of the Year, is back with a new single to validate all of your cynical and antisocial tendencies. "A mass grave of seven billion idiots/ a mass grave of pathogenic proclaimers/ diseased procreators," the band gutturally belts at the end of the song. A powerful hailstorm of guitars and drums litter the breakdowns and break neck pace. It's sure to please the metal crowd in need of an outlet.

Posted inFeedback FileMusic+Clubs

ONE AT A TIME: Oukuo takes us to “The Blue City”; The Four20s take us to “Foureverland”; and Down Under takes us there

[embed-2]
“The Blue City,” Oukuo

Guitarist, songwriter, and bandleader Thomas Kenney continues to show his range as a musician on his latest project, Oukuo. While the busy musician is best known for electro jam band Doom Flamingo and world-beat group Terraphonics, Kenney shows his chops as a producer on “The Blue City.” A dance beat keeps the song flowing through instrumental solos, reaching a climactic peak at the end. It begs for a dance-club remix, stat.

“Foureverland,” Four20s
Speaking of musicians that can’t seem to sit still for too long, the Four20s released their debut single, “Foureverland,” this week. Incorporating the soulful vocals of Saeed, the band of sought-after musicians creates an emotive alt. R&B jam. Keyboardist Rodrick Cliche left his fingerprints all over the track, most noticeable in the electronic production tucked behind the lead vocals.

“Calling Your Name,” Steve Ray Ladson
R&B and pop singer Steve Ray Ladson’s latest single, “Calling Your Name,” is now available on streaming. Ladson’s sound is usually made-for-radio jams, and his latest is no exception. His confident voice sounds like it was meant for acoustic and piano love songs like this one.

“We’ve Got Time,” Jerry Feels Good
Jerry Feels Good, Clayton James, and Stormy put out a hybrid of a track with “We’ve Got Time.” It’s a little pop, a little rap, a little club-inspired dance music, and a lot of groove. The verses are straight-forward and bouncing rap bars, while the chorus and bridge were built for a DJ set.

[embed-1]
“Of Treachery and the Flesh (ft. Lou Thor of Depressor),” Down Under
Down Under, City Paper‘s 2019 Metal Band of the Year, is back with a new single to validate all of your cynical and antisocial tendencies. “A mass grave of seven billion idiots/ a mass grave of pathogenic proclaimers/ diseased procreators,” the band gutturally belts at the end of the song. A powerful hailstorm of guitars and drums litter the breakdowns and break neck pace. It’s sure to please the metal crowd in need of an outlet.