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CAT CORE | Girlpants

It’s always a shame when funk music doesn’t utilize the bass. Luckily, we don’t have to worry about that with Girlpants, the latest project from singer/instrumentalist Julie Slonecki. Turning one of the most underappreciated instruments into its greatest asset, the power pop group carves out four solid dance, funk, and post-punk tracks for their debut EP, Touch of the Mania. Girlpants takes a decidedly ’80s approach to their sound. The title track features a subtle and groovey synth riff, while the chorus gets loud and melodic, going for broke to its benefit. “Cosmos” sees your sweet pop electronic keyboards and raises you existential lyrics. “Bite your lip and make a wish/ when the abyss looks back/ blow it a kiss,” Slonecki sings. “Scorpio Rising” is probably the hardest track out of the collection, centered around a garage rock riff and a darn catchy pop hook just waiting to get caught in the listener’s head. That’s all well and good, but what really sets the group apart is the “cat core” or “kit hop” insignia they proudly wear as their genre. This is because Slonecki, who always plays in comedy-funk band Sexbruise?, and bassist Scotty Groth are joined by Simon the Cat in Girlpants. Simon doesn’t really play any instruments; he’s just a cat who happens to be the third member. Touch of the Mania is out now on Spotify. You can learn more about the band at facebook.com/girlpantsband. —Heath Ellison


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INDIE | Veja Du

Electronic indie duo Veja Du released the music video for their latest single, “TV Land,” on Friday. The song comes from their ambitious debut LP, a 15-song concept album about a “supernatural journey of self discovery and rebirth,” keyboardist Zac Crocker told the City Paper in December. The video shows plenty of natural (and concrete) landscapes for the band to sing and dance in while the lyrics pop up to illustrate the message. “I can’t help thinking everything is alright/ as everything around me is falling down,” Crocker sings. It’s sweet to think, especially in 2020, that there’s plenty of inward happiness to find while the world shakes. The music for “TV Land” still kicks just like it did when the band released their self-titled album last year. The lyrics are introspective, surreal, and a little romantic. “Black hole spinning at the speed of sound/ lying with you, enjoying the view,” the band sings. The track’s sonic textures are rhythmically charged, made stronger by waves of keys and electronic pulses. Veja Du’s latest video can be seen on YouTube or charlestoncitypaper.com. Their self-titled debut LP is available on Spotify. —Heath Ellison