Posted inFeedback File, Music+Clubs

Soundchecks: Happy Sandman, Sarah Summer

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ART ROCK | Happy Sandman

“Bizarre” is probably the way one would describe Happy Sandman’s new single and music video, “Lovers Ladder.” The song emits a disturbing sound, with distorted vocals and intense guitar riffs. The video matches the song, flashing through clips of Happy Sandman, covered in clay with bright red lips and black eyes that roll back in his head as he climbs up a ladder, or lies on a pile of clay scraps. It’s unsettling to say the least. Its inspiration and meaning aren’t, however. Outside of music, Happy Sandman is a ceramicist and works on his tunes and art simultaneously at his pottery studio in Summerville. “I wanted to explore the concept of human and clay becoming one,” Sandman explains, giving the video a bit of clarity. Going into some of the artistic choices of the video, Sandman notes “the opening sequence of the music video shows me entering a machine that fires and entwines the ingredients to complete the final stage of the process.” The video, while still eerie, explores the ceramic process in a new way, with the human as the clay to be manipulated. You can check out more Happy Sandman at facebook.com/happysandman. —Eliana Katz

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FOLK | Sarah Summer

Lowcountry native Sarah Summer started dabbling in video production about three years ago as a way of showcasing her exquisite original tunes. “As I was on pace to release my first EP, I wanted to be heard, which meant that I had to be seen,” she says. “I am introverted to the core but I do love the opportunity to deliver my poetry from a vantage point. Film has given me such liberty.” Though she now calls Arizona home, Summer credits her upbringing in South Carolina for her boldly creative spirit. “The culture in which I grew up was, you make the most with what you’ve got, even if it’s next to nothing, and if you don’t know how, you try until you figure out a way that works. That’s my nature.” As it happens, Summer’s new single, “Jollymonster,” holds extra-special meaning for the earthy and eclectic artist. “I was playing ukulele for my baby and sang it freestyle, exactly the way I later recorded it.” The lyrics illustrate her belief that whatever is in your heart will “stew and spill out.” This song, in particular, is “a reminder to take care with what you let in,” she says. Additionally, Summer has prepared yet another release in her stunning video series to accompany her other new song, “Side Six & Five.” The piece features Summer performing for a miniature audience of one. “It is a sweet time capsule and a very real look at my daily life in music-making. It took five takes and two naps to edit.” —Kevin Wilson

Posted inFeedback File, Music+Clubs

Soundchecks: Happy Sandman, Sarah Summer

Provided

[embed-2]

ART ROCK | Happy Sandman

“Bizarre” is probably the way one would describe Happy Sandman’s new single and music video, “Lovers Ladder.” The song emits a disturbing sound, with distorted vocals and intense guitar riffs. The video matches the song, flashing through clips of Happy Sandman, covered in clay with bright red lips and black eyes that roll back in his head as he climbs up a ladder, or lies on a pile of clay scraps. It’s unsettling to say the least. Its inspiration and meaning aren’t, however. Outside of music, Happy Sandman is a ceramicist and works on his tunes and art simultaneously at his pottery studio in Summerville. “I wanted to explore the concept of human and clay becoming one,” Sandman explains, giving the video a bit of clarity. Going into some of the artistic choices of the video, Sandman notes “the opening sequence of the music video shows me entering a machine that fires and entwines the ingredients to complete the final stage of the process.” The video, while still eerie, explores the ceramic process in a new way, with the human as the clay to be manipulated. You can check out more Happy Sandman at facebook.com/happysandman. —Eliana Katz

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FOLK | Sarah Summer

Lowcountry native Sarah Summer started dabbling in video production about three years ago as a way of showcasing her exquisite original tunes. “As I was on pace to release my first EP, I wanted to be heard, which meant that I had to be seen,” she says. “I am introverted to the core but I do love the opportunity to deliver my poetry from a vantage point. Film has given me such liberty.” Though she now calls Arizona home, Summer credits her upbringing in South Carolina for her boldly creative spirit. “The culture in which I grew up was, you make the most with what you’ve got, even if it’s next to nothing, and if you don’t know how, you try until you figure out a way that works. That’s my nature.” As it happens, Summer’s new single, “Jollymonster,” holds extra-special meaning for the earthy and eclectic artist. “I was playing ukulele for my baby and sang it freestyle, exactly the way I later recorded it.” The lyrics illustrate her belief that whatever is in your heart will “stew and spill out.” This song, in particular, is “a reminder to take care with what you let in,” she says. Additionally, Summer has prepared yet another release in her stunning video series to accompany her other new song, “Side Six & Five.” The piece features Summer performing for a miniature audience of one. “It is a sweet time capsule and a very real look at my daily life in music-making. It took five takes and two naps to edit.” —Kevin Wilson