Photo by Pedro Lastra on Unsplash

Charleston and other low-lying coastal cities will experience increased high-tide flooding now through the mid-2030s thanks to a perfectly normal and yet very unwelcomed moon “wobble.” It all has to do with the moon’s 18.6-year orbit and … well, these stories had us at “more high-tide flooding.” More: NPR, USA Today, The Post and Courier

In other headlines:

Solicitor gets data requested in Sutherland case. The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office has handed over 162 gigabytes of information about the Jan. 5 death of Jamal Sutherland in its jail. Ninth Circuit Solicitor Scarlett Wilson said Wednesday that she still has not determined whether charges will be filed. More: AP News, The Post and Courier

Two state lawmakers call for audit of S.C. earmarks. State Sens. Wes Climer, R-York, and Dick Harpootlian, D-Richland, earlier this week sent a letter to the State Fiscal Accountability Authority calling for an audit of groups that received millions of taxpayer dollars from state budget earmarks. More: The State/Charlotte Observer

S.C. gets support of 20 other states in abortion lawsuit. Alabama and 19 other state attorneys general have filed an amicus brief in South Carolina’s defense of a new abortion law that would ban most procedures in the state. The filing argues that U.S. District Judge Mary Geiger Lewis overstepped her authority when she put the entire abortion law on hold, rather than just the portion being challenged. More: AP News

Forget the moon wobble: Deluge of COVID-19 cases feared in S.C. Cases of coronavirus have spiked 58% over last week to 204 confirmed cases Wednesday. While that’s far fewer than what was in January, officials are warning of another surge in cases and deaths with more than half of the state remaining unvaccinated. More: AP News

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